ITALIANO

  • Assisi

    Distance from Tenuta - Km 8

    www.comune.assisi.pg.it

     

    Assisi is located in central-eastern Umbria, nestled on the slopes of Mt. Subasio, overlooking the plain formed by the Topino and Chiascio rivers, tributaries of the Tiber.

    It is the birthplace of St. Francis and St. Clare, and it has become famous throughout the world as a universal center for the Franciscan message of peace and brotherhood.

    Built in the typical pink stone from Mt. Subasio, Assisi lives in and shares with visitors its atmosphere of profound spirituality made unique in all the world by the history and faith of its saints.

    HISTORY

    Founded by the ancient Umbrians, Assisi was later taken over by the Etruscans. In the 1st century BC it became an important Roman municipium. In 545 AD it was attacked by the Goths led by Totila; they were succeeded by the Lombards, who incorporated it into the Duchy of Spoleto. In the 12th century it acquired the privileges of an independent commune, but could not hold on to its independence for long: political and military instability continued until the 16th century, when, after various rules (the papacy, the Visconti, Braccio Fortebraccio and Francesco Sforza), Assisi became part of the Papal States and, except for the brief Napoleonic period, it remained under the rule of the pope until 1860, with the birth of the Italian state.

  • Bastia Umbra

    Distance from Tenuta - Km 10

    www.comune.bastia.pg.it

     

    Located in central Umbria, Bastia Umbra that rises on the plains of the Chiascio River, today a fertile countryside where there probably once stood a lake that was drained in the 6th century AD.

    HISTORY

    In Roman times it was known as the Roman Insula, as it had the appearance of an island surrounded by the waters of the “Lacus Umber” (Umbrian Lake), an ample body of water that covered the Umbrian Valley, probably a marshy area that was drained in the 6th century AD. This area had considerable importance in the 14th and 15th centuries when, as a city-fortress, it was fought over by Perugia and Assisi. In the end, Perugia won, and Bastia became a fief under the Baglioni family until the extinction of the family name in the 17th century. In the mid-1600s it came under the rule of the Papal States, which maintained control of the city until the unification of Italy.

  • Bettona

    Distance from Tenuta - Km 6

    www.comune.bettona.pg.it

     

    Located in central Umbria, Bettona sits on a hill in the eternally green valley of the Chiascio river, from which there is a wonderful view of nearby Perugia, Assisi and Spello. A walk around the perimeter of the ancient city walls is like standing on a balcony and taking in the plain of the Valle Umbra on one side and the Monti Martani hills on the other. Because of its remarkable environmental, cultural and art heritage Bettona was included in the club of “The Most Beautiful Villages in Italy.”

    HISTORY

    An ancient Umbrian-Etruscan settlement, Bettona was conquered by the Romans, who made it a municipium. In the 12th century, after the barbarian invasions, it became an independent commune, but in 1352, after a lengthy siege, it was conquered and destroyed by Perugia. In 1367 the Church ordered Cardinal Albornoz to rebuild the town, which soon after became part of the Papal States. Immediately after it returned under the rule of Perugia and the Baglioni lords. In 1648 it was incorporated permanently into the Papal States, remaining there until 1860.

  • Bevagna

    Distance from Tenuta - Km 5

    www.comune.bevagna.pg.it

     

    Located in the heart of Umbria, Bevagna stands on the western edge of the plain of Foligno, at the foot of the hills upon which Montefalco arises, at a bend in the Timia River. The hill in the Umbra Valley where the city emerges is surrounded by a fertile plain rich in water, where grain, grapevines, and olives are grown. Its notable environmental, cultural and artistic heritage has earned it membership in the “Borghi più Belli d’Italia” (Italy’s Most Beautiful Villages) club.

    HISTORY

    An ancient Umbrian center, the first historical accounts of Bevagna coincide with the Roman conquest of Umbria, when the Romans occupied the zone and built the western branch of the Via Flaminia (220 BC) and respective connecting roads. In 90 AD, it became an important Roman municipium called Mevania. After the fall of the Roman Empire, various battles were fought over it, and it passed under the rule of Spoleto, Foligno, the Holy Roman Empire, Perugia and the Papal States. In 1439 it came under definitive control of the Church and remained a part of Papal States, except for a brief period under Napoleon, until the birth of the Kingdom of Italy in 1860.

  • Cannara

    Distance from Tenuta - Km 6

    www.comune.cannara.pg.it

     

    Cannara is located in the heart of Umbria, in the middle of the Valle Umbra plain on the left of the Topino river, facing Assisi and Spello.

    According to tradition, its name comes from the many cane thickets that once grew in the marshy areas along the Topino.

    HISTORY

    Cannara’s origins go back to the ancient Umbrians and Romans, and after the fall of the Roman Empire and the Lombard invasion, Assisi and Perugia fought to control it for many years. In 1352 it became part of the Duchy of Spoleto, and in 1424 Braccio da Montone conceded it to the Baglioni of Perugia, who held on to it until 1684, when the entire area came under the dominion of the Church, until the birth of the Kingdom of Italy (1860).

  • Castiglione del Lago

    Distance from Tenuta - Km 75

    www.comune.castiglione-del-lago.pg.it

     

    Located in the northwestern part of Umbria, Città di Castello is spread out along the Upper Tiber Valley, at the border with Tuscany and not far from the Marche.

    The area holds many pleasant surprises for the visitor: steeped in history, it has a wealth of monuments and centuries of culture in an environment where respect for nature goes hand in hand with a thriving industry.

    HISTORY

    Founded by the ancient Umbrians, Città di Castello became a Roman municipium with the name Tifernum Tiberinum. After being subject to various rules and having been sacked and destroyed by Totila and the Goths (6th century AD), it was rebuilt and fortified and given first the name Castrum Felicitatis, followed by, starting in the 10th century, its final name of Castrum Castelli. It established itself as an independent commune in the first half of the 12th century, and in the 15th century it was ruled by the Vitelli family. During the Middle Ages it went through periods of independence interspersed with other periods under the rule of the papacy, Florence, and Perugia. It was not until the 16th century that Cesare Borgia took the town once and for all for the Papal States, under the rule of which it remained (except for the brief Napoleonic period) until the proclamation of the Kingdom of Italy (1860).

  • Città di Castello

    Distance from Tenuta - Km 75

    www.cdcnet.net

     

    Located in the northwestern part of Umbria, Città di Castello is spread out along the Upper Tiber Valley, at the border with Tuscany and not far from the Marche. The area holds many pleasant surprises for the visitor: steeped in history, it has a wealth of monuments and centuries of culture in an environment where respect for nature goes hand in hand with a thriving industry.

    HISTORY

    Founded by the ancient Umbrians, Città di Castello became a Roman municipium with the name Tifernum Tiberinum. After being subject to various rules and having been sacked and destroyed by Totila and the Goths (6th century AD), it was rebuilt and fortified and given first the name Castrum Felicitatis, followed by, starting in the 10th century, its final name of Castrum Castelli. It established itself as an independent commune in the first half of the 12th century, and in the 15th century it was ruled by the Vitelli family. During the Middle Ages it went through periods of independence interspersed with other periods under the rule of the papacy, Florence, and Perugia. It was not until the 16th century that Cesare Borgia took the town once and for all for the Papal States, under the rule of which it remained (except for the brief Napoleonic period) until the proclamation of the Kingdom of Italy (1860).

  • Deruta

    Distance from Tenuta - Km 15

    www.comunederuta.gov.it

     

    In the centre of Umbria, just 15 km from Perugia, Deruta stands on the hills bordering the left bank of the Tiber River. Its dominating view takes in the surrounding hills sloping down to the fertile fields of the enormous plain.

    Deruta is well-known for its majolica and is a member of the Italian Association of Ceramics Towns with its certification mark for Artistic and Traditional Ceramics.

    HISTORY

    The origins of the town go back to ancient times. When Perugia conquered the territory in the 12th century, Deruta was transformed into a border fortress to defend Perugia against Todi and other potential enemies, but by the 13th century Deruta had its own statute and governed itself independently. The 14th and 15th centuries were periods of great upheavals with alternating dominations, destruction and large-scale plagues. Domination by the Baglioni family from Perugia in 1500 was the start of the reconstruction of most of the town and meant that Deruta was able to rise from its ashes. During the Salt War in 1540, Deruta sided with the Roman Catholic Church, which went on to win the war and rewarded the town by exonerating it from paying taxes for many years. From that time on it was part of the Papal States until the Unification of Italy. From mid 1500 the town enjoyed a long period of peace that coincided with an all-time peak in majolica production that made Deruta famous all over the world.

  • Foligno

    Distance from Tenuta - Km 20

    www.comune.foligno.pg.it

     

    The third largest city in Umbria after Perugia and Terni, Foligno is located in central-eastern Umbria, on the plain at the foot of the Umbria-Marche Apennines, where the Topino and Monotre rivers meet.

    The area includes the beautiful Valle Umbra plain, framed by gentle hills and the spurs of the Apennine chain.

    HISTORY

    Foligno was founded by the ancient Umbrians, followed by the Romans, who made it a municipium and an important post on the Flaminian Way. Later destroyed by barbarian invasions and subsequently rebuilt, it became an independent commune in the 11th century, but in about 1310 it came under the seigniory of the powerful Trinci family (vicars of the Church after 1336), under whose rule the town developed considerably. With the Trinci it extended its dominion over many neighboring towns (Assisi, Spello, Montefalco). In the 15th century it became part of the Papal States, remaining under its rule (except for the brief Napoleonic period) until 1860, when it became part of Italy with the birth of the Italian State.

  • Gubbio

    Distance from Tenuta - Km 60

    www.comune.gubbio.pg.it

     

    Located in northeastern Umbria, Gubbio sits on the slopes of Mt. Ingino, overlooking a fertile plain. The town of the Ceri (chosen as the symbol of the Region of Umbria) is one of Umbria’s most important centers and attracts many tourists interested in art.

    With its centuries-long tradition as a pottery town, it is a member of the Italian Association of Ceramics Towns ("Artistic and Traditional Ceramics" national seal).

    HISTORY

    Gubbio is an ancient town whose origins go back to the height of the Umbrian civilization, as can be seen from the Eugubine Tablets (seven bronze tablets with writing in the Umbrian language, preserved at the Civic Museum in Palazzo dei Consoli). The Romans gave it the name Iguvium, and later Eugubium. Destroyed by the Goths (552), who were succeeded first by the Byzantines (592) and then the Lombards (772), it rose again in the 11th century, when it was established as an independent commune. In the 12th century, Gubbio, under the spiritual guidance of Bishop Ubaldo, the great protector of Gubbio, won a war against Perugia and other nearby towns. Thanks to its thriving industry (specialized in majolica pottery), it reached its greatest splendor in the 14th century, during which time many monuments were built and it took on the medieval appearance that still has today. In 1384 it became part of the Duchy of Urbino, and went with Urbino to the Papal States in 1631.

  • Montefalco

    Distance from Tenuta - Km 20

    www.comune.montefalco.pg.it

     

    Situated in the central west of Umbria, Montefalco stands on a hill carpeted with olive trees and grape vines, in the middle of the valley of the Clitunno, Topino and Tiber rivers. This breath-taking position has led to Montefalco being known as The Balcony-rail of Umbria.

    Because of its environmental, cultural and artistic heritage, Montefalco has become part of the club The Most Beautiful Villages of Italy.

    HISTORY

    Montefalco was already an important municipality in Roman times due to its dominant position above the valley connecting Spoleto and Perugia. From the 11th century the town flourished in the culture of the free communes and the Renaissance. The 13th and 14th centuries saw many clashes with the surrounding communes, particularly because it often sided with the Papacy against the Ghibelline lords of Foligno, the Trici family. The Foligno seigniory dominated the town for about 50 years, until it was liberated in 1424 by Francesco Sforza. The regaining of freedom led to the drawing up of the municipal statutes and a veritable rebirth of the arts and the economy. This period saw the evolution to Montefalco's present historical town-centre layout and the artistic development that reached its height with the masterpieces by Benazzo Gozzoli in the High Renaissance period. It was only in a much later century, after having lost and regained its independence, that the town received the title of "city" from Pope Pius IX in 1848.

  • Orvieto

    Distance from Tenuta - Km 75

    www.comune.orvieto.tr.it

     

    Orvieto is a spectacular town of Etruscan origin that stands on a massive tabletop of tuff in southwestern Umbria, overlooking the Paglia river valley.

    The town has a rich art and cultural heritage, and holds the magic and power of three thousand years of history, visible in its medieval urban structure that has remained unchanged over time.

    With its centuries-long tradition as a pottery town, it is a member of the Italian Association of Ceramics Towns (“Artistic and Traditional Ceramics” national seal).

    HISTORY

    Orvieto’s origins go back to the Etruscan civilization: the earliest settlements in the 9th century BC localized around the caves in the tuff massif upon which the town currently stands. Archeological evidence shows that the city reached its economic and artistic peak between the 6th and 4th century BC. After 263 BC the Romans took hold of the city, leaving intact the institutions, customs and language of the Etruscans, but changing its name to "Urbs Vetus" (from which comes its present-day name of Orvieto). After the fall of the Roman Empire, it was conquered first by the Goths, then the Byzantines, then the Lombards of the Duchy of Spoleto. In about 1000 AD it underwent new urbanistic, economic and social development, and soon became an independent commune with a government that Pope Adrian VI officially recognized and legitimated in 1157. In the 12th century, following victorious battles against Siena, Viterbo, Perugia and Todi and with the alliance of Florence, it extended its borders, ruling vast areas of the present-day regions of Tuscany and Lazio. Medieval Orvieto’s power and wealth reached its peak in the 13th and 14th centuries, as can be seen from the splendid buildings the town is still proud of today. After a period of civic and religious strife among Orvieto’s noble families, in 1354 Cardinal Albornoz reasserted the papacy’s control over the area. In 1449 it permanently became part of the Papal States, and remained so until 1860, with the birth of the Kingdom of Italy.

  • Perugia

    Distance from Tenuta - Km 15

    www.comune.perugia.it

     

    Perugia, the regional capital, is an ancient city located in central-northern Umbria. The historic center is built on the high hills along the right bank of the Tiber River.

    An art town that draws large numbers of visitors, Perugia is a multiethnic and multicultural center with two universities, a synthesis of the region’s multifaceted character: culture, art, history, religion, crafts, food and wine, and the natural environment.

    HISTORY

    Etruscan in origin, Perugia later became a flourishing Roman municipium called "Augusta Perusia". After the fall of the Empire, it suffered the barbarian invasions and was destroyed by Totila and the Goths (547 AD). It was then conquered by Byzantines, and became one of the strongholds of their dominion against the expansion of the Lombard Duchy of Spoleto. Perugia remained Byzantine until the 8th century, when it came under papal rule, and when it became an independent commune in 1000 AD it remained an ally of the papacy. The friendship with the Church of Rome deteriorated irremediably in the 14th century when Perugia destroyed Foligno, an ally of the Pope: from that time on, Perugia’s history was an endless succession of civil struggles, conspiracies, betrayals and wars, until the Papal States under Pope Paul III took control once and for all. Perugia was deprived of every freedom and independence, and all attempts at overthrowing papal rule were punished with massacres and destruction. In 1860 Perugia was joined to the Kingdom of Italy.

  • Spello

    Distance from Tenuta - Km 15

    www.comune.spello.pg.it

     

    Situated in the central west of Umbria between Assisi and Foligno, Spello lies across the southern slopes of Mount Subasio, looking down on to the fertile valley of the Topino river.

    Because of its remarkable environmental, cultural and artistic heritage it has become part of the club The Most Beautiful Villages in Italy.

    HISTORY

    After the Ancient Umbrii who according to many historians founded Spello, came the Romans who called the colony Julia Hispellum (circa 41 BC) and gave impetus to the town’s most important historical period.

    After the fall of the Roman Empire the town was destroyed by the Ostrogoths led by Totila and became part of the Longobard Duchy of Spoleto. After the turbulent years of the Early Middle Ages, it became an independent commune in the 12th century.

    Towards the end of the 14th century Spello was under the rule of the Baglioni family from Perugia who held it until 1583. During this time the town lived an intense period of artistic activity and was enriched with Renaissance masterpieces by Pintoricchio, Perugino and Alunno.

    Spello then came under the dominion of the Papal States, except for the brief Napoleonic period, until 1860.

  • Spoleto

    Distance from Tenuta - Km 50

    www.comunespoleto.gov.it

     

    Located in southeastern Umbria, Spoleto is one of the region’s most fascinating art towns. Its wealth of history, varied cultural heritage and important arts events make it one of the tourist destinations most highly esteemed by visitors.

    HISTORY

    An important fortified Umbrian settlement, Spoleto became a Roman colony and later a municipium (90 BC). After the fall of the Roman empire, it was taken over first by Theodoric, king of the Visigoths, and then by the Byzantine Belisarius. Seized by Totila, it was rebuilt by the Byzantine general Narses. In the early Middle Ages, it became the capital of the Lombard Duchy of Spoleto. In 1155 Spoleto was conquered and destroyed by Frederick Barbarossa, and after a series of conflicts between the Guelfs and the Ghibellines it was conquered again by Cardinal Albornoz, who secured it for the papacy and made it an important town in the Papal States. Apart from the brief period under Napoleon, the papal rule continued unbroken until Spoleto joined the new Italian State.

  • Todi

    Distance from Tenuta - Km 40

    www.comune.todi.pg.it

     

    Located in central-southern Umbria, Todi is a splendid art town perched high on top of a hill overlooking the Middle Tiber Valley.

    Its great historic, art and architectural heritage makes it one of the most popular tourist destinations in Umbria.

    HISTORY

    Probably of ancient Umbrian origin, Todi was one of the towns in contact with the Etruscan civilization that flourished on the right bank of the Tiber River, and it was a thriving center in the 5th-4th centuries BC. In Roman times it was a colony and a municipium. Todi’s lofty position and solid defense system saved it from destruction during the barbarian invasions, and it was able to live in relative peace during the turbulent early Middle Ages. In the 12th century it became an independent commune, the start of a very prosperous period, which saw the construction of many of its outstanding monuments. Its independence did not last long, however, due to the continuous fighting against Spoleto, Orvieto and Narni. In 1230 the leading religious poet of the 13th century was born in Todi: Jacopo Benedetti, better known as Jacopone da Todi. Political and military instability continued until the 16th century when, after being under various rules, Todi became part of the Papal States, remaining there (except for the Napoleonic period) until 1860.

  • Torgiano

    Distance from Tenuta - Km 10

    www.comune.torgiano.pg.it

     

    Located in the heart of Umbria, Torgiano is an old fortified medieval village that developed where the Chiascio River meets the Tiber, amid sinuous hills carpeted with vineyards and olive groves. An internationally famous wine-producing area, in 1968 the wine of Torgiano became one of the first in Italy to obtain the DOC (controlled designation of origin) seal.

    Framed by an enchanting landscape, steeped in history, art, culture and nature, Torgiano has been able to blend its deep-rooted history with modern hospitality.

    HISTORY

    The Torgiano area was settled in Roman times, as is proved by archeological discoveries (remains of a villa, epigraphs). Later it was occupied by the Goths and the Lombards. In the 13th century the castle was built, and Torgiano came under the dominion of Perugia, and shared the same fortunes. Following the defeat of Perugia in the “Salt War” (1540), Torgiano became a territory of the Papal States, and except for the period of French occupation (1798), it remained under papal rule until 1860, when it joined the Kingdom of Italy.

  • Trevi

    Distance from Tenuta - Km 35

    www.comune.trevi.pg.it

     

    Situated in central-west Umbria between Foligno and Spoleto, Trevi rises from the slopes of Mount Serano, which are carpeted in olive tree plantations overlooking the Spoleto Valley. Churches, towers and palaces give a noble silhouette to the town that stands at 412 metres, offering a breath-taking view onto the Via Flaminia.

    Because of its remarkable environmental, cultural and artistic heritage, Trevi has become part of the club The Most Beautiful Villages in Italy.

    HISTORY

    Founded by the Romans, it was an important town along the Via Flaminius. At the fall of the Roman Empire, having already been Christianised by Bishop Emiliano, it was occupied by the Longobards and included in the Duchy of Spoleto. During the Middle Ages Trevi was ruled by Foligno and Spoleto. Political and military instability continued until the 16th century when, after domination by various lords (Trinci, Michelotti, Sforza), Trevi became part of the Papal States and remained under their domination, except for the brief Napoleonic period, until 1860.

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